The Tribune Democrat, Johnstown, PA

Latest News

October 25, 2012

The popular kids are now rich adults

WASHINGTON — He-ey girls! I was just looking through our high school yearbook, reminiscing about all the AMAZING times we had together. Remember when we all wore matching baby tees for Senior Spirit Day? Remember when we had that party after the big football game and didn't invite any of the theater nerds and drank a lot of Zima and it was AWESOME? OK, well, anyway. I just read this study from the National Bureau of Economic Research and now I understand why I am rolling in dough.

Get this: These researchers — Gabriella Conti, Andrea Galeotti, Gerrit Mueller and Stephen Pudney — totally found that students who were more popular in high school make more money later on. They measured popularity using a concept from social network theory called "in-degree" — basically the number of friendship nominations a student receives from his classmates. (The number of nominations a student gives is called out-degree, and it doesn't correlate with increased income, since it only measures how popular the kid thinks he is.) These researcher people found that just one more in-vote in high school is associated with "a 2 percent wage advantage 35 years later." That advantage is equivalent to 40 percent of the wage boost you'd get from another whole year of education. Awesome shortcut!

I know what you're thinking. You're like, but what about factors like socioeconomic status, family background, school quality, IQ, human and social capital, and adult personality traits? What about the idea that more contacts in high school could spill over into more adult connections, which certainly doesn't hurt anyone networking for a job? The study totally controlled for all that.

Crazy, right? In case you're wondering, the three biggest determinants of friendship nominations were whether someone had a "warm early family environment," whether they shared attributes that were common among a lot of the students (this idea called homophily says that we flock to people who have similar characteristics to us, in terms of age, race, gender and religion), and whether they were "relatively older and smarter" than their peers. For my part, I am so glad my parents kept reassuring me that I am a glorious precious sapphire whose light will never dim, and that they decided to wait a year before starting me in kindergarten.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Latest News
  • The case for separate beds

    The other night I slept on a twin bed in the guest room of the house I share with my husband and our two kids.
    It was the best night's sleep I've had in years.

    April 19, 2014

  • Why do wolves howl?

    Of all the myths that dog the wolf, none is more widely accepted than the idea that wolves howl at the moon. Images of wolves with their heads upturned, singing at the night sky, are as unquestioned as a goldfish's three-second memory or a dog's color-blindness (both also myths).

    April 19, 2014

  • Raw oysters spike U.S. rise in bacterial infections, CDC reports

    Raw oysters, so good with hot sauce, increasingly can carry something even more unsettling to the stomach: A bacteria linked to vomiting, diarrhea and pain.

    April 19, 2014

  • Consumer spending on health care jumps as Affordable Care Act takes hold

    Nancy Beigel has known since September that she would need hernia surgery. She couldn't afford it on her $11,000 yearly income until she became eligible for Medicaid in January through President Barack Obama's signature health care law.

    April 19, 2014

  • VIDEO | Boston bomb scare defendant appears in court

    The man accused of carrying a backpack containing a rice cooker near the Boston Marathon finish line on the anniversary of the bombings was arraigned Wednesday. He's being held on $100,000 bail.

    April 19, 2014

  • Denne, Williams & Stanton Records hearing scheduled

    A Cambria County judge will consider complaints filed by two Johnstown residents seeking documents related to the city’s municipal waste water operation at hearing at the end of this month.

    April 18, 2014 1 Photo

  • Sen. Bob Casey Casey targets heroin

    The heroin trade has brought addiction, death, violence and theft to Johnstown and other Pennsylvania communities.
    Figuring out how to deal with those issues is difficult for local, state and federal officials.

    April 18, 2014 1 Photo

  • Drive-in to open with high-tech projector

    Drive-in movie theaters and the term “state of the art” seldom share the same sentence.
    But that will soon be the case for the Silver Drive-In, it’s owner said. The Scalp Avenue site, often marketed as a nostalgic summer night escape, soon will boast a high-end projector capable of displaying the latest and greatest blockbusters in razor sharp high-definition, theater owner Rick Rosco said.

    April 18, 2014

  • Sheetz work underway

    Earthmoving is underway at Richland Town Centre for a nearly 6,500-square-foot Sheetz store.
    And the real estate broker marketing the land says a 3,000-square-foot retail building will be built next door.

    April 18, 2014

  • Smith, Shakir Mosi Police seize heroin, money in Prospect

    Johnstown police reported that several bricks of heroin, along with $4,000 in cash and a handgun, were discovered in the city's Prospect neighborhood around 4 a.m. Friday. An arrest warrant has been issued for the man be­lieved to be the owner or renter of the two homes raided.

    April 18, 2014 2 Photos

Poll

Do you think that Jack Williams will get the 270 signatures from city residents needed in order to have a referendum placed on a municipal ballot to have the city's pressure test mandate repealed?

Yes
No
I'm not sure
     View Results
Order Photos


Photo Slideshow

House Ads