The Tribune Democrat, Johnstown, PA

State News

November 14, 2012

Evening News Brief | Student workers at Hershey facility win back wages

HERSHEY —

Three companies have agreed in a federal settlement to pay back wages to hundreds of foreign students for summer jobs they held at a Hershey candy company facility in Pennsylvania.

Lemoyne-based SHS Group, Ohio-based Exel Inc. and California-based Council for Educational Travel USA agreed to pay $213,000 in back wages to 1,000 students who held summer jobs repackaging candy. The Hershey Co. owns the facility but wasn't accused of wrongdoing because Exel operated it.

The U.S. Department of Labor said Wednesday the three companies overcharged the students for housing, reducing their wages below what they were supposed to be paid. It says the settlement provides fines for two of the companies.

Exel agreed to pay $143,000 in fines for excessive workplace noise. SHS was fined $5,000 for other violations.

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State court throws out 'wrongful birth' lawsuit ban

HARRISBURG — A Pennsylvania appeals court says the Legislature violated the state constitution when it included a ban on lawsuits based on "wrongful birth" in a statute with other provisions.

A Superior Court panel issued a 3-to-0 ruling Wednesday in the case of an expectant couple. They sued doctors and medical facilities for allegedly not telling them the mother-to-be was a carrier of a genetic mutation that causes familial dysautonomia, a rare neurological condition.

The judges say the lawsuit ban wasn't sufficiently related to the rest of the bill when it passed in1988, so violated the constitution's "single-subject" provision.

The plaintiffs' lawyer, Richard Abraham, says the parents are suing to collect the millions of dollars for medical care their son will need. Sheila Ann Haren, a lawyer for the defendants, declined comment.

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Hospital fires tech after meds are switched

PITTSBURGH — A Pittsburgh hospital has fired a pharmacy employee after discovering that pain-killing medications were switched.

The Jefferson Regional Medical Center says Wednesday that the unmanned technician had been substituting a non-narcotic medication for Oxycodone.

The hospital says about 360 people who received medical care between June and October of this year may have received the substitute, but they are not aware of any adverse reactions.

The hospital is notifying all patients who might have been affected, and has also alerted state and federal authorities to the problem.

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